Frailty

picto-francais Version française

 

Formal and informal support for the oldest age groups is increasingly important in cases of ill-health and disability, as well as for older people on low incomes, with little social capital, and poor access to information.

 

Ageing and family support: responding to life course events

In France and elsewhere in Europe, ageing research has demonstrated the importance of family solidarity and social networks in promoting ageing in place. However, a combination of individual and contextual factors can place certain population groups at risk, especially if the availability of social support is low. Intergenerational exchanges inside and outside the household, affect the level of services given and received and the quality of social care differs over time, together with patterns of support involving personal care, domestic and administrative tasks. These changes are analysed in relation to life-course histories and the changing relationships between ageing parents and their adult children, modified in response to wider family changes such as divorce, separation, and widowhood. Attention is given to the consequences for living arrangements, incomes, and health. Older women living alone are in particular exposed to unfavourable circumstances, especially within minority ethnic communities. In addition to family and migration factors, the transformation of welfare systems and retirement reforms that aim to lengthen the working life impact on the availability of family support. Research is undertaken based on the concept of 'frailty' in order to enhance social policies on preventing dependency and promoting active ageing.

 

More information : Publications

Last content

Key figures

December 2015

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Intergenerational relations

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Older people from minority ethnic groups

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Frailty

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Habitat and Housing

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